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Environmental Studies & Wildlife Management

EV 105 Earth’s Physical Systems (4)
The goal of this course is to understand the dynamic natural systems that operate in Earth’s environments. Emphasis is placed on processes that form and transform the surface of the planet. Factors that impact human activities are stressed. Topics include earth-sun relationships, weather, classification of climate, composition and structure of the solid earth, soil formation, groundwater, streams, glaciers and coastal processes. Three hours of lecture and a two hour lab each week. Offered fall semesters.

EV 111 Physical Geology (4)
Introduction to the composition and structure of the Earth, and to the dynamic forces in the planet’s interior. The course also examines surficial processes that erode and transform rock to produce landforms and landscapes. Topics include minerals and rocks, volcanoes, earthquakes, origin of ocean basins, structure and motions of continents, formation of mountain ranges, geologic hazards, and mineral resources. Three hours of lecture and a two hour lab each week. Offered spring semesters.

EV 112 Historical Geology (4)
The historical evolution of planet Earth from its origin to the present. Emphasis is placed on methods and theory used by scientists to decipher the “rock record.” The importance of fossils is stressed. Topics induce the concept of geologic time, dating techniques, interpretation of rock sequences and reconstructing ancient environments (including climates and biotic communities). Three hours of lecture and a two hour lab each week. Prerequisite: EV 111 or permission of the instructor.

EV 224 Environmental Science (4)
The study of the impact of human activities on the environment. Fundamental ecological concepts which indicate the balance of nature without humans are compared to current problems caused by human domination of the world. Topics include air, water and land pollution, energy and overpopulation. Three hours of lecture and a two hour lab each week. Prerequisite: MA 103. Offered fall semesters.

EV 235 Women and the Environment (4)
An investigation into the role of women in various countries and their impact on the environment. The status of women and problems women face in both developing and undeveloped countries will be addressed. The impact of women in ecological literature, environmental policy and health are some topics covered in the course.

EV 312 The Illinois River Valley and Its People (4)
Ecological, environmental, and economic factors will be addressed with an emphasis on how humans have used and changed this ecosystem and how the ecosystem has determined local social and economic patterns throughout the past. Field trips and lab exercises which take students to important ecological and historical sites along the Illinois River will be incorporated into the laboratory component. Offered alternate fall semesters.

EV 317 Environment and Society (4)
This course explores the relationship between human societies and the natural world. Examining the environment from a sociological perspective allows students an opportunity to consider ways that individuals and societies affect both the natural and built environments, and reflect on the influence of these environments on human communities. This course also provides an opportunity to: assess impacts of the built and natural environments on human behavior, social organizations, and social movements; examine the relationship of consumption patterns to existing environmental problems; explore the role of technology, both in creating and addressing environmental problems; and identify patterns of social organization and their impacts on resource use. Prerequisite: SO101. Offered alternate spring semesters. (See SO 317).

EV 324 Ecological Interactions (4)
Principles of ecology, illustrated by lecture and by the investigation of selected types of habitats. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Field trips. Prerequisite: MA 133 and BI 238. Recommended: MA 123 or BI 207. (See BI 324).

EV 326 Ecology of the Northern Woods (4)
This course focuses on land use in the northern woods of Upper Michigan. Students will investigate logging, fishing, and mining in the upper Great Lakes region. Ecological, environmental, and economic factors will be addressed with an emphasis on how humans have used and changed this ecosystem and how the ecosystem has determined local social and economic patterns throughout the past 150 years. A mandatory one week long field trip to Northern Michigan is required. Permission of the instructor and a trip fee are required.

EV 344 Principles of Wildlife Management (4)
Wildlife management and other natural resource fields are both arts and sciences that deal with complex interactions in the environment. Wildlife “science” is based on scientific principles, which will be covered in this course. Techniques of managing wildlife, managing nature preserves and problems of managing large refugees will be included. Topics include evaluating and determining habitat requirements and management techniques for a number of bird and mammal species. Several field trips to local US fish and wildlife areas are required as part of the course. Offered alternate fall semesters.

EV 349 Environmental Health (4)
This course explores the relationship between human societies and the natural world. Examining the environment from a sociological perspective allows students an opportunity to consider ways that individuals and societies affect both the natural and built environments, and reflect on the influence of these environments on human communities. This course also provides an opportunity to: assess impacts of the built and natural environments on human behavior, social organizations, and social movements; examine the relationship of consumption patterns to existing environmental problems; explore the role of technology, both in creating and addressing environmental problems; and identify patterns of social organization and their impacts on resource use. Prerequisite: SO 101. Offered alternate spring semesters. (See SO 349).

EV 355 Ecohydrology: Field and Research Methods (4)
This course addresses the quantification of hydrologic transfers of chemical species to natural waters and ecosystems through utilization of field techniques. The scientific method, including hypothesis generation and justification, experimental design, literature review, conducting an experiment, and data analysis and interpretation will be taught as students perform research on an individual topic in ecology and/or environmental science. Field trips are required. Three hours of lecture and a two hour lab each week. Prerequisite: CH 110. Recommended EV 111. Offered spring semesters.

EV 461, 462 Independent Study Environmental Studies (1 - 4)

EV 463, 464 Internship in Environmental Studies (1 - 4)
Students serve as interns in private or public organizations which oversee, study, or manage environmental resources. Internships may involve public issues, scientific research, or have business applications. For horticulture, students will work at a local landscape company, learning all aspects of horticulture. Topics covered will include plant cultivation, plant diseases, and small business management techniques. Students must have junior standing and permission of the Academic Dean or EV coordinator to enroll.

EV 465, 466 Independent Research in Environmental Studies (1 - 4)

EV 485 Environmental Studies Capstone (3-4)
This course serves as the capstone experience for senior Environmental Studies/Environmental Biology and Ecological Studies majors. It may include the internship and/or independent research experience, or may follow successful completion of an internship (EV 463 and/or EV 464) and/or independent research (EV 465 and/or EV 466). A capstone internship or independent study must be completed during, or the summer prior to, the senior year. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.