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Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar to speak on “The United States and Torture After 9/11”
David Forsythe, University of Nebraska professor and Charles J. Mach Distinguished Professor of political science emeritus, will speak at Illinois College as part of the Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Program on Thursday, November 7, at 7 p.m. in Kirby Learning Center, Room 6.

Forsythe’s expertise is on international human rights, international law and organization, American foreign policy, and international relations. For the presentation, he will talk on “The United States and Torture After 9/11.”

His published works include The Humanitarians: The International Committee of the Red Cross, Human Rights in International Relations (3rd ed.), The United Nations and Changing World Politics (7th ed.), American Foreign Policy in a Globalized World and The Politics of Prisoner Abuse. Forsythe also is the general editor of the Encyclopedia of Human Rights.

Forsythe joined the University of Nebraska as a faculty member in 1973 and was given the career achievement award by the Academic Senate in 2012. He is a recipient of the Quincy Wright Distinguished Scholar Award from the International Studies Association-Midwest and a Distinguished Scholar Award from the American Political Science Association (Human Rights Section). Forsythe was also named a Distinguished Scholar by the International Studies Association, Human Rights Section). In 2008 he held the Senior Fulbright Distinguished Research Chair for human rights and international studies at the Danish Institute for International Studies.

The presentation is free and open to the public. For more information contact the Office of Academic Affairs at 217-245-3010 or aporter@mail.ic.edu.

About the Phi Beta Kappa Society’s Visiting Scholar Program: Since 1956, the program has been offering undergraduates the opportunity to spend time with some of America’s most distinguished scholars. The purpose of the program is to contribute to the intellectual life of the institution by making possible an exchange of ideas between the Visiting Scholars and the resident faculty and students. The 13 men and women participating during 2013-2014 will visit 100 colleges and universities with chapters of Phi Beta Kappa, spending two days on each campus and taking full part in the academic life of the institution. They will meet informally with students and faculty members, participate in classroom discussions and seminars, and give a public lecture open to the entire academic community. Now entering its 58th year, the Visiting Scholar Program has sent 611 Scholars on 5,004 two-day visits.

Founded in 1776, Phi Beta Kappa is the nation’s oldest academic honor society. It has chapters at 283 institutions and more than half a million members throughout the country. Its mission is to champion education in the liberal arts and sciences, to recognize academic excellence, and to foster freedom of thought and expression.

Additional information about the Visiting Scholar Program can be found on Phi Beta Kappa’s website, www.pbk.org.
 

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