Academics >  Convocation Program >  Fall/Spring 2012-2013 > 

Friday, November 9, 2012

 
 
IC Fine Arts Series
 
Thomas Murray, organist

Friday, November 9, 2012
7:30 p.m. | Rammelkamp Chapel
 
Thomas Murray, concert organist and recording artist, is University Organist and Professor of Music at Yale University, where he has served on the faculty for 29 years. Widely known for his interpretations of Romantic repertoire and orchestral transcriptions, his many recordings are highly acclaimed. With an international reputation and many honors and awards, this will be his first time performing at Illinois College.
 
 
 
Monday, November 12, 2012


 
 
 
First Amendment and Martin Luther King
 
Stephon Ferguson
 

Monday, November 12, 2012
11:00 a.m. | Sibert Theatre
 
This convocation will feature Stephon Ferguson who performs oratorical "reenactments" of Martin Luther King's speeches.
 
 
 
 
Monday, November 12, 2012

 
 
"A Tribute to Our Veterans"
 
 Representative  Jim Watson and Jacksonville AMVETS
 
 
Psychology Club
 
Veteran's Day Program
 
 
 
 

Monday, November 12, 2012
11:00 a.m. | Rammelkamp Chapel
 
The psychology club of Illinois College will be honoring our veterans with a color guard presentation by Jacksonville's AMVETS.  Representative Jim Watson will speak about the true meaning of Veteran's Day.  
 
Monday, November 12, 2012


 
Diversity Week's Japanese Tea Ceremony
 
Mrs. Kimiko Gunji
 

Monday, November 12, 2012
5:00 p.m. | Presentation in Kirby 6 followed by demonstration in Lincoln Multi-purpose room
 
Coalition for Ethnic Awareness and Japanese Floor welcome Mrs. Kimiko Gunji from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to discuss and demonstrate a Japanese Tea Ceremony.
 
Wednesday, November 14, 2012
 
 
 
"Around the World: Common Bonds in Uncommon Cultures"
 

Wednesday, November 14, 2012
7:30 p.m. | Sibert Theater
 
Illinois College students gather to share significant aspects of their cultures.
Monday, November 19, 2012


 
IC Connections
 
Amanda McGrory on Sports and Community

Monday, November 19, 2012
11:00 a.m. | Rammelkamp Chapel
 
At age five, McGrory was diagnosed with a rare disease that left her paralyzed from her waist down. After an extensive rehabilitation program, her love affair with the sport of wheelchair racing began. Under the coaching of former American marathon champion Scot Hollonbeck, who pushed McGrory to become a marathoner, McGrory took home four medals in Beijing and became one of the best in the world. In this presentation, gold medalist Amanda McGrory will discuss the role of community in helping her adapt to life as a person with a disability and how it helped her find success in sports. 
 
 
Saturday, December 8, 2012


 
 
Choir Christmas Concert
 
 
 
 
Saturday, December 8, 2012
7:30 p.m. | Rammelkamp Chapel
 
The Illinois College Music Department will present their annual Choral Christmas Concert, “Glory in the Highest,” on Saturday, December 8, at 7:30 p.m. in Rammelkamp Chapel.

Various choirs will perform Christmas classics and new favorites in a candlelit setting. Choirs surround the audience as voices seem to float down from above in a dramatic presentation for the whole family. Traditional melodies like “Lo, How A Rose E’re Blooming,” “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing” and “Silent Night” mingle with fresh modern arrangements and unique international offerings.

“From ancient chant melodies and beautiful Bach fugue, to Christmas madrigals and African drumming, we’ve even thrown in some Bono and U2,” Director of Choirs Abby Musgrove said. “There’s something for everyone.”

The 75-minute Choral Christmas Concert featuring four choirs, various instrumentalists and candlelit audience carols is free and open to the public.
 
Wednesday, January 23, 2013

 
 
IC Fine Arts Series
 
Capitol Steps

Wednesday, January 23, 2013
7:30 p.m. | Rammelkamp Chapel
 
The Capitol Steps began in December, 1981 when some staffers for Senator Charles Percy were planning entertainment for a Christmas party. Their first idea was to stage a nativity play, but in the whole Congress they couldn’t find three wise men or a virgin. So, they decided to dig into the headlines of the day, and they created a special brand of satirical humor. Since they began, they have recorded over 30 albums, including their latest, Take the Money and Run — for President. They’ve been featured on NBC, CBS, ABC, and PBS, and can be heard four times a year on NPR stations nationwide during their Politics Takes a Holiday radio specials. Their logo says it all: We put the mock in Democracy. 
 
Tuesday, January 29, 2013


 
 
Mario Venegas on Human Rights and Torture
 
Amnesty International

Tuesday, January 29, 2013
7:00 p.m. | Kirby Learning Center, Room 6
 
Former Chilean political prisoner Mario F. Venegas tells his story about being detained and tortured when the dictator Pinochet took power in Chile in 1973. He will also show the documentary, "Beneath the Blindfold," which sheds light on human rights abuses and torture taking place in our world. He will conclude by discussing what we can do to help stop these abuses.
 
Monday, February 4, 2013

 
 
Jeffrey Ball
"Slow Burn: America at an Energy Crossroads"
 
 
 
Woodrow Wilson Fellow

Monday, February 4, 2013
11 a.m. |  Kirby Learning Center, Room 6
 
Jeffrey Ball, this semester's visiting Woodrow Wilson Fellow, is currently a Scholar-in-Residence at Stanford University's Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance. Until recently, he was the Wall Street Journal’s environment editor. Ball spent more than a decade at The Journal writing about energy and the environment, in particular about the economic viability of changing the way the world consumes fossil fuels. He covered the auto industry for the Journal out of its Detroit bureau, and the oil industry from the paper’s Dallas bureau. In 2009, he wrote a Journal column called Power Shift, which won an award from the National Press Foundation for its coverage of the changing energy and environmental landscape. He spent most of 2010 covering the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, focusing on questions about the spill’s environmental effect. Ball has appeared on PBS, NPR, CNN and the BBC, among other networks.

The Steyer-Taylor Center, a joint initiative of Stanford’s law and business schools, was created in early 2011 to study and advance the development of clean-energy technologies through policies and financial mechanisms that make economic sense. Ball’s research will focus on the intensifying race among companies and countries to corner the clean-energy market, and the implications of that race for consumers and the planet.
 
Wednesday, February 6, 2013

 
 
Jeffrey Ball
 
"Green Game: Tales from the Global Race to Make Clean Energy Big"
 
 
 
Woodrow Wilson Fellow

Wednesday, February 6, 2013
7 p.m. | Rammelkamp Chapel
 
Jeffrey Ball, this semester's visiting Woodrow Wilson Fellow, is currently a Scholar-in-Residence at Stanford University's Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance. Until recently, he was the Wall Street Journal’s environment editor. Ball spent more than a decade at The Journal writing about energy and the environment, in particular about the economic viability of changing the way the world consumes fossil fuels. He covered the auto industry for the Journal out of its Detroit bureau, and the oil industry from the paper’s Dallas bureau. In 2009, he wrote a Journal column called Power Shift, which won an award from the National Press Foundation for its coverage of the changing energy and environmental landscape. He spent most of 2010 covering the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, focusing on questions about the spill’s environmental effect. Ball has appeared on PBS, NPR, CNN and the BBC, among other networks.

The Steyer-Taylor Center, a joint initiative of Stanford’s law and business schools, was created in early 2011 to study and advance the development of clean-energy technologies through policies and financial mechanisms that make economic sense. Ball’s research will focus on the intensifying race among companies and countries to corner the clean-energy market, and the implications of that race for consumers and the planet.
 
Monday, February 18, 2013

 
 
Ta-Nehisi Coates
 
 "Emancipation, Race and Radicalism"
 
 
Al Habtoor Leadership Lecture

Monday, February 18, 2013
11 a.m. | Rammelkamp Chapel
 
The Leadership Program will welcome Ta-Nehisi Coates, senior editor of The Atlantic to campus as the 2013 Al Habtoor Leadership Lecturer. He is also identified by many as one of the world’s best bloggers. His recent controversial article in The Atlantic, “Fear of a Black President,” provoked both anger and praise. He is best known for his nuanced reading of and writing about the racial tensions inherent in American history and ideology including the Emancipation Proclamation.
 
Monday, February 18, 2013
 
 
 
Japanese Management
 
Dr. John Volkmar
 
Japanese Studies Lecture Series

Monday, February 18, 2013
11:00 a.m. | Kirby Learning Center, Room 6
 
Based on his personal experiences in Japan and on his research, Dr. John Volkmar will talk about the role that the study of Japanese management has played in the development of current management theory and practice.
 
Dr. John Volkmar holds a Ph.D. in International Business Administration from Temple University. He has twenty years of public sector managerial experience, and has held a wide range of management positions in logistics and transportation management both in the US and abroad.
Monday, February 18, 2013
 
 
 
"The Other 1492"
 
Professor Teofilo Ruiz

Monday, February 18, 2013
7:00 p.m. | Kirby Learning Center, Room 6
 
1492 has long been seen as the "miracle year" of Spanish realms.  This lecture addresses the importance of 1492 from different perspectives.  Instead of examining the so-called achievements of the Catholic Monarchs (Their victory over Granada, religious and political unity, and the encounter with the New World), Professor Ruiz will look at what the events of 1492 meant for those who bore on their flesh the brunt of a new centralized monarchy, religious intolerance, and colonial expansion.  His focus is on Jews, Conversos, Muslims, Moriscos, and the natives of the New World for whom 1492 represented a radical and catastrophic change in their individual and collective lives.  By examining the history of Jews, Muslims, and New World natives during the transition from the Middle Ages to modernity, he describes the growing tolerance ushered in by military conquest, religious intolerance, and political centralization.
Wednesday, February 20, 2013
 
Wishing President and Mrs. Steuer
a good blessing
 
 
Wednesday Chapel Service

Wednesday, February 20, 2013
10:00 a.m. | Rammelkamp Chapel
 
This program is part of a week-long series of student-led events and activities honoring President and Mrs. Steuer. The weeklong series of events is named President’s Week and will run Monday, Feb. 18 through Friday, Feb. 22. The chapel service is titled Wishing President and Mrs. Steuer a Good Blessing. President Axel Steuer will be the main speaker with the coordination of Rev. Katrina Jenkins. A selection of Mrs. Steuer’s favorite hymns will be performed. The College’s liturgical dance group will perform a dance of celebration.
Saturday, February 23, 2013

 
 
IC Fine Arts Series
 
Cantus Vocal Ensemble

Saturday, February 23, 2013
7:30 p.m. | Rammelkamp Chapel
 
Acclaimed as the “premier men’s vocal ensemble in the United States” (Fanfare), the group’s adventurous musical choices have garnered high praise, and the Washington Post hails the ensemble’s sound as having both “exalting finesse” and “expressive power” and refers to their music-making as “spontaneous grace.” This a cappella group will amaze and delight.

This engagement is supported by the Arts Midwest Touring Fund, a program of Arts Midwest, is generously supported by the National Endowment for the Arts with additional contributions from Illinois College. 
 
Monday, February 25, 2013
 
 
"The Truth that Military Historians Do Not Tell: How Language Shapes our Thinking about War"
 
Dr. Eugenia C. Kiesling

Monday, February 25, 2013
11:00 a.m. | Rammelkamp Chapel
 
Noted historian Jennie Kiesling, Professor of History at the US Military Academy, will speak about the ways in which Americans have a misperception of the nature of war, and how that misperception is rooted in the failure of military history adequately to portray the true costs of war.
Monday, March 11, 2013

 
 
Arata Takeda
 
What Makes a Suicide Attacker?
Perspectives from Literature
 

Monday, March 11, 2013
11:00 a.m. | Sibert Theatre
 
The question of what makes a suicide attacker has been addressed by various disciplines ranging from anthropology and psychology to religious studies and political science. Whereas it seems easy to relate it to culture or religion, scholars have answered to the question very differently, yet the focus has largely remained on ‘real facts’. In this presentation Arata Takeda will explore what literature and imagination have to say about the making and the evaluation of suicide attackers. He will also examine what literature can contribute to cultural and security policy today.

Arata Takeda, Ph.D., is currently Feodor Lynen Research Fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in the Department of Germanic Studies at the University of Chicago. Fluent in seven languages, he received his undergraduate education at International Christian University, Tokyo, Japan, spent a year at Ca’ Foscari University in Venice, Italy, and earned graduate degrees from the University of Tübingen, Germany, where he has also taught courses on modern German literature and comparative literature.
Monday, March 11, 2013

 

 
 
"The Most Important Era in U.S. History that You Never Heard of, And Why It’s Important Today"
 
James Loewen
 
Joe Patterson Smith Lecture

Monday, March 11, 2013
8:00 p.m. | Kirby Learning Center, Room 6
 
Award-winning socio-historian and author of the best-selling Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your History Textbook Got Wrong and Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism, James Loewen will give this year’s Joe Patterson Smith Lecture “The Most Important Era in U.S. History that You Never Heard Of, and Why It’s Important Today” on Monday, February 11 at 8:00 pm.
Monday, March 18, 2013
 
 
 
"Examining the "Indian Princess:" Kiowa Women and the American Indian Exposition, 1934-1945"
 

Monday, March 18, 2013
11:00 a.m. | Kirby Learning Center - Room 6
 
Examining the "Indian Princess," explores the lives and representations of Kiowa and other American Indian women though the lens of the American Indian Exposition, an all-Indian fair and powwow started in 1934 by local American Indians in Anadarko, Oklahoma, a regional hub for several Native nations in western Oklahoma. In accordance with women's history month, this presentation examines the representations of American Indian women and the historical legacies that women created. It does so by discussing how they participated in the Exposition, emphasizing how they created and challenged a pan-Indian identities emerging in the twentieth century. I also explore the role and representation of young Kiowa women as "princesses" in this event, asking how Kiowa women negotiated this image of American Indian women in popular culture.

    
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