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V. Assessment in the Divisions of the College
V. Assessment in the Divisions of the College (PDF)
  1. The Vice President Assessment Synthesis Report Each vice president authors a summary and analysis of the assessment activities in their division. In part, this report addresses the following questions:
    1. Were your expectations regarding assessment practices in the division met by the current year’s report?
    2. What were some of the useful assessment practices that should be of interest to many division constituents?
    3. What were some of the most common deficiencies in assessment practices within the division? Of these deficiencies, which ones should be corrected most urgently? How can these deficiencies be remedied in the next year?
    4. Are there assessment initiatives that will be introduced and carried out in the division over the next year, e.g., new methods or instruments?
    5. What procedural or policy changes are recommended as a result of assessment data analysis?

    The Vice President’s report is submitted to the constituents of their respective division, i.e., the faculty in Academic Affairs and the staff in the other divisions of the College. These reports also are submitted to the Chair of the Assessment Committee. Reports in The Academic Affairs, Student Affairs, and Advancement Divisions are submitted by August 15. Reports in the Enrollment and Financial Affairs Divisions are submitted by September 15.

  2. Integration of Assessment Results and Decision Making Processes in the College Divisions
    1. Division of Academic Affairs Curricular and instructional changes that are adopted by departments or programs should be based on information collected, in part, by the formal assessment process. Many of these changes pertain to existing courses and are not expected to affect most members of Academic Affairs. Analysis of department or program assessment data may suggest that significant curricular changes are needed. Such changes include new course proposals, deletion of old courses, and changes to the requirements for the major or the minor. Because significant curricular changes require faculty review and approval, the department or program presents an explanation, which should include assessment data and analysis. The usual procedure for authorizing significant curricular changes in academic programs includes approvals by the respective academic division, the Educational Policies Committee or the Curriculum Review Committee, and the full faculty. Often, changes in academic programs may be tested successfully for their impact on student learning through pilot studies. When proposing changes in academic programs these points should be addressed:
      1. The purposes of the proposal.
      2. An explanation of the anticipated impact on student learning and development.
      3. A plan that addresses how changes in student learning will be measured.
      4. An evaluation of the availability of resources to sustain the proposed program changes, including personnel, classroom space, and technological resources.
    2. Division of Student Affairs Analysis of assessment data may suggest that significant program changes are needed. Such changes include revisions to the policies regarding student health, e.g., changes in the alcohol consumption policies, as well as major revisions to the social structures on Campus, e.g., changes in student government, literary societies, and other student organizations. Because such changes are likely to have a significant impact on student life on Campus, the unit presents an explanation, which should include assessment data and analysis. The usual procedure for authorizing policy changes in the Student Affairs Division involves approvals by the Student Life Committee, the Vice President of Student Affairs, and then the President. The Vice President of Student Affairs will inform the faculty of such changes. Often, changes in academic programs may be tested successfully for their impact on student learning and social interactions through pilot studies. Proposed changes in student life programs should address these points:
      1. The purposes of the proposal.
      2. An explanation of the anticipated impact on student learning and development.
      3. A plan that addresses how changes in student learning and development will be measured.
      4. An evaluation of the availability of resources to sustain the proposed program changes.
    3. Administrative Divisions (Advancement, Enrollment Management, and Financial Affairs) Analysis of assessment data may suggest that significant program changes are needed. Because such changes are likely to have serious impact on all Campus constituents, the unit presents an explanation, which should include assessment data and analysis. The usual procedure for authorizing changes in the administrative divisions involves approvals by the appropriate Vice President and then the President, who will report the changes to the faculty. Often, changes in strategies and policies may be tested successfully for their impact on unit performance through pilot studies. Proposed changes in administrative divisions should address these points:
      1. The purposes of the proposal.
      2. An explanation of the anticipated impact on DPU outcomes.
      3. A plan that addresses how changes in DPU outcomes will be measured.
      4. An evaluation of the availability of resources to sustain the proposed program changes.

    
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